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Monthly Archives: May 2017

All about Multimedia Patient Education

Among the essential elements of patient education develops skills, responsibility and group effort: patients should know when, how and what to do should include changing the way of life and every member of the medical team of the patient. Since technology has given us new ways of delivering education to patients and health care providers, the availability of resources, formats and techniques have increased dramatically.

Choosing the right resources and making the most of the limited educational budgets are becoming more and more difficult. Education is playing an increasingly important role in the care of patients and their families are faced with many difficult decisions that could potentially have a major impact on their health and quality of life.

The multimedia is better than no training or education, given as part of routine clinical care to improve the knowledge of the patient. There is great variation in the results from six studies that compared the multimedia training usual care or no training. But all but one of the six studies favored multimedia training. We also found that multimedia education is superior to usual care or no training to improve levels. The review also suggested that multimedia is at least as effective as other forms of training, including training or written brief training of health professionals.

Multimedia program to educate patients about medicines:

  • Multimedia learning about medicine is more effective than usual care (non-standardized education of health professionals as part of normal clinical care) or no education, improvement, and acquisition of knowledge and skills.
  • Multimedia training for at least another form of education, training, and education are included in the health care professional is the same as written. However, this finding is based on the often low-quality evidence from a small number of attempts.
  • Multimedia education about drugs can, therefore, be considered as a supplement to conventional therapy, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend it as a substitute for a written instruction or training health worker.
  • Multimedia education can be considered as a supplement to conventional treatment, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend it as a substitute for a written instruction or training health worker.
  • Multimedia training can be considered as an alternative to the training of health care workers, especially in areas where it is not possible to provide detailed training health worker.

Digital Connectivity Education

Offering dedicated, uninterrupted and cost-effective connectivity options to students to help them access and exploit the global reservoirs of information and information tools for better learning, understanding and experience.

Enabling virtual collaboration facilities amongst students and faculty to improve information exchange; promote collaborative learning and exchange of ideas.

Encouraging and enabling teachers to devise digitally stimulating and compatible teaching methods. And use technology for improving children’s learning capabilities.

Facilitating online interaction of parents with teachers for improved liaison.

The realization of the above objectives is possible with the collaborative efforts of the four most important factors:

Leadership: There is a need for strong, decisive and long term leadership in the space of digital education. If our governments and educational institutions can come together put in place such strong leadership, it will go a long way in improving education using digital connectivity.

Infrastructure: While several improvements have come about in the connectivity space. The last-mile connectivity is still a challenge in far flung areas. Without the right infrastructure it would not be possible to employ connectivity any better.

Teacher’s Involvement: Teachers & faculty must take the most important step in integrating connectivity & digital tools to improve learning amongst children. Teachers are the vital cog in the wheel to use increased connectivity in education.

Learning Resource: As connectivity improves, there is now an acute need for learning resources to be available in the digital formats. This will encourage students to use the connectivity channels more authoritatively.

About Implementing Online Learning

Although online learning has been around for at least 10 years, it is a large and growing area of expertise. Online learning may look like nothing more than words and pictures on a computer screen, but failing to understand and respect its complexities has led to many delayed, under realized and failed projects. By doing the same two things recommended to the crew above you can push your online learning project to succeed rather than become marooned on a deserted island of despair. Let’s look at these two steps:

First – understand and respect the complexities of online learning

Online learning is high technology. It is right up there with software applications, network servers, and above all “The Web”. You don’t need to become an expert in all of these things to lead a successful online implementation project, but you do need to understand what is needed and how to assemble the right team and resources to ensure success.

Here are some things you’ll want to know and questions you’ll want to ask to prepare yourself:

You’ll need a technology infrastructure (network servers, bandwidth and computers for example) and the people to set them up and maintain them. These questions will help define any technology challenges you might face and so plan how to overcome them.

Where will students take the online courses I will offer? How many different kinds of locations are there? How many students will be taking the courses at about the same time? How long will the courses take? Will students complete courses in one session or return several times?

Where will I get my learning content? Will I purchase ready made courses? If I do will I need to customize them? If I write my own courses, what tool will I use to create them? Will my courses come from more than one source?

What will the courses look like? Will they be mostly text with a few pictures or will they be data rich with many images, URL’s, and interaction? How long will they be? Based on this, how much “bandwidth” will I need and with what other of my organization’s applications must I compete to get it? Which individuals in my organization (or elsewhere) must I get to know (and become influential) in order to get the resources I’ll need to succeed? Who in my organization can influence others to get the technical resources I’ll need?

On what servers will my content reside? Will they be on my network, hosted somewhere else, or a combination of several environments? Will students need to access the courses from outside of these networks? If so, will network security requirements permit them to do this?

You’ll need to decide how students will access the online courses, you offer, what they’ll do while there, and what information you’ll need as a result.

Do your students currently have access to other training information and tasks? For example, can they enroll in instructor led courses or take other training actions? Do you want to incorporate the online learning into this same environment? Where will students be when they need access to this environment? Will network security requirements permit them to do this?

What do I need to know during and after the training? Is it important to know who took what and when they took it? Do I need reports? Who else needs information – Managers, Employees, and Executives – and what do they need? How will I get this information? How will I distribute it to the right people at the right time?

If more than one software system is used (for example online content and a Learning Management System) how will I integrate them? It may, for example be important to learn about the SCORM system of standards which allows different systems to work together.

Make Homework Done

Set a Right Spot to Do Your Work

Picking up a quiet and well-lit spot is very important when you start with your homework. A dull and noisy place would distract you and make you feel lazy. You should choose a table or a desk to work on – it keeps you alert, unlike sitting on your bed that makes you sleepy.

Be Motivated

Pick the time of the day when you are most motivated – everyone has his/her own time when he/she is most motivated. If you are a little less motivated, do pick up the task that is easiest for you to finish up first – This will energize you and boost up your confidence and motivation. You can also queue up some of your favorite tunes to pump up your motivation.

Stay Away from Distractions

The whole world seems to play a conspiracy to disturb you when you sit for finishing up your homework, isn’t it? Keep yourself away from all the potential disturbing elements before you sit back to do the most important part of your day. Switch off your PC/laptop if you don’t require it in your homework. If your PC is essential, only keep relevant tabs open… strictly, no cheating here! Say ‘NO’ to social networking websites – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, etc. are really interesting sites to visit, but surely not during your homework time. Keep your mobile on silent mode – texts, WhatsApp messages and promotional emails keep ringing the mobile, make sure you avoid keeping your phone nearby when you do your homework. Let your friends and family know you are working, excuse yourself for some time and you can join them once you are done with your homework. Keep your stationary, schoolbag, notes and textbooks handy, so that you don’t have to get up again and again. This would increase your efficiency and keep you pumped up for the next task.