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All about Multimedia Patient Education

Among the essential elements of patient education develops skills, responsibility and group effort: patients should know when, how and what to do should include changing the way of life and every member of the medical team of the patient. Since technology has given us new ways of delivering education to patients and health care providers, the availability of resources, formats and techniques have increased dramatically.

Choosing the right resources and making the most of the limited educational budgets are becoming more and more difficult. Education is playing an increasingly important role in the care of patients and their families are faced with many difficult decisions that could potentially have a major impact on their health and quality of life.

The multimedia is better than no training or education, given as part of routine clinical care to improve the knowledge of the patient. There is great variation in the results from six studies that compared the multimedia training usual care or no training. But all but one of the six studies favored multimedia training. We also found that multimedia education is superior to usual care or no training to improve levels. The review also suggested that multimedia is at least as effective as other forms of training, including training or written brief training of health professionals.

Multimedia program to educate patients about medicines:

  • Multimedia learning about medicine is more effective than usual care (non-standardized education of health professionals as part of normal clinical care) or no education, improvement, and acquisition of knowledge and skills.
  • Multimedia training for at least another form of education, training, and education are included in the health care professional is the same as written. However, this finding is based on the often low-quality evidence from a small number of attempts.
  • Multimedia education about drugs can, therefore, be considered as a supplement to conventional therapy, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend it as a substitute for a written instruction or training health worker.
  • Multimedia education can be considered as a supplement to conventional treatment, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend it as a substitute for a written instruction or training health worker.
  • Multimedia training can be considered as an alternative to the training of health care workers, especially in areas where it is not possible to provide detailed training health worker.